Skip to main content
jump to navigation
The Official Website of Minor League Baseball
Below is an advertisement.
Prospect Pitch: Bedrosian back to work
Angels' first-rounder battling in first season back from surgery
06/27/2012 10:00 AM ET
Cam Bedrosian was the 29th overall selection in the 2011 Draft.
Cam Bedrosian was the 29th overall selection in the 2011 Draft. (Paul R. Gierhart/MiLB.com)
Cam Bedrosian is back to using his adult-sized mitt, but it's clear the Angels are keeping the kiddie gloves on their first-round draftee in 2010, Tommy John surgery victim in 2011 and ninth-ranked prospect in 2012. For proof of this, look not at the three pitches he is throwing but at the three he is not yet throwing:

  • On the slider, a pitch his dad -- Cy Young Award winner Steve Bedrosian -- taught him at East Coweta High School in Georgia: "They want me to get the curveball down pat."
  • On the cut-fastball, a pitch he's toyed with off to the side in his first full pro season at Class A Cedar Rapids: "They said, 'Wait for now.'"
  • On the two-seam fastball, a pitch that could offer a devastating contrast to his mid-90 mph four-seamer: "Just want to get through this year."
"The second year after the surgery is when you start getting everything back. So I'm just trying to push through until then, until I get everything back, and then," Bedrosian said, "I can't wait."

Working with an intentionally simple three-pitch repertoire and on a limiting 80-pitch-count in the interim, Bedrosian (2-6, 5.31 ERA) completed six scoreless innings -- and earned his first pro win -- on June 9 against Clinton, then tossed up five more zeroes on June 14 opposing Burlington. But the 20-year-old right-hander suffered another setback last Friday when he allowed a season-high five runs to Beloit over three innings.

He has yielded three or more runs in six of his 10 post-op outings.

"It's frustrating. It is," he said. "Coming back from it, it's been tougher than I first imagined. I thought, 'Once I get to about 12 months and get back in the system and throwing again, I'll be all ready to go.' But it's been a lot tougher getting a feel for everything. My first couple of starts were a little -- I was a little wild. It was hard to control the fastball and other pitches. Each time I throw, I feel a little bit better."


MiLB.com asked Bedrosian to describe and grade each of the three pitches he is employing. (His grade is based on a scout's traditional 20-80 scale, 50 being the Major League average.) Here is Bedrosian, in his own words.

Pitch one: Four-seam fastball


Purpose: That's my go-to pitch. I mess with a two-seam a little bit, but not so much. That's more work for next offseason. I fiddled around with it in high school. Right now, I put it on the back-burner.

Grip: Traditional four-seam.

Speed: I like to see it between 92 mph and 94, 95. So far this year, it's been down a little bit -- probably 90 to 92 -- coming off of surgery, which is, they say, normal for the first couple of months coming back.

Grade: Right now? 50-55. I think it's a good pitch. Lately, the command has been good.

Pitch two: Changeup


Origin: I learned a whole new grip this year. I used to throw a two-seam changeup, but I switched to a four-seam to make it more deceiving coming off a four-seam fastball. Our pitching rover, Kernan Ronan, and my Cedar Rapids pitching coach, Trevor Wilson, were telling me about how they thought it was a little more deceiving to hitters, and I agree with that. Sometimes a hitter can pick up a two-seam grip off a pitcher's hand more than a four-seam, so if you throw the same grip, it's a little bit tougher to pick it up out of the hand.

Purpose: Not a ton of movement to it. Just something to mix up speeds to get the hitters off balance. It cuts a little bit right now, but I think I just have to get a feel for it and, after a while, maybe I can put a little movement on it.

Grip: Four-seam changeup. Middle and ring fingers on top of the ball.

Speed: I like to see it 83-84 to 86, somewhere in there.

Grade: 50. It's working well -- for not throwing it very long, it's working well. I threw it a lot my last three starts.

Pitch three: Curveball


Origin: In high school, my dad taught me how to throw a slider and then I started messing around with moving my thumb and taught myself the curveball. It wasn't too hard for me to learn at first because I had thrown that slider.

I threw both in high school and when I got to pro ball the Angels told me to get one of the two down pat. We all came to an agreement that the curveball -- if you can throw it, it's a harder pitch to hit it.

Purpose: It's more of a strikeout pitch, but lately I've been throwing it for strikes. I try to throw it any count.

Grip: My middle finger is on the seam on the right side of the horseshoe -- my index finger is behind it to give it a little snap -- and my thumb is on the other side of the horseshoe.

Speed: Anywhere from 77 to 79.

Grade: 55. I've struggled with it a little bit this year, coming off surgery, but lately it's been better.

Andrew Pentis is a contributor to MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at AndrewMiLB. This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.
MiLB.com Comments
Today on MiLB.com

Poll